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Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can be very serious. In the resources below, you'll find information on what symptoms to look out for, how to best protect yourself and others, as well as what actions to take if you've been in contact with someone with measles.

What 
you need to know

Measles outbreak in Auckland


Quick resources
FAQs - Measles pregnancy | Map of confirmed cases | Whānau Pack - GPs and EDs
Whānau Pack - ELSs | Measles Pack - Schools | Measles Pack - Workplaces

MMR vaccine priorities have changed, see here.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or call your GP.

Please do not just turn up to your GP, after hours or emergency department as you could potentially infect others.


UPDATE: As at 2PM, 18 November there have been 1664confirmed cases of measles this year

For health professionals

 

For all education providers

 

For ELSs

For schools

For workplaces

For the public 

 

For GPs & EDs

  • Fact sheet - Information for people with suspected measles  PDF (ARPHS)
    Samoan  Tongan
  • Fact sheet - Information for close contacts exposed to measles  PDF (ARPHS)
    Samoan  Tongan

For ELSs

For schools

Key messages

Samoan Tongan Cook Island Māori Te Reo Māori 
中文 Chinese (simplified) 한국 Korean 
हिन्दी Hindi  

New Zealand Sign Language

Update - 2 October 2019  Update - 11 October 2019

Auckland Measles Map 18112019 FINAL

You usually start to feel unwell 10–14 days after you have caught the virus. You are likely to get a fever, cough, runny nose, sore and watery pink eyes and sometimes small white spots inside your mouth. At around day three to seven you will get a blotchy rash. This rash first appears on your face and then spreads to your head and body. It can last for up to a week.

People with measles can spread it to others five days before and until five days after their rash appears.

Measles is caused by a virus, so antibiotics won’t cure it. If you or your child has measles, stay away from others until at least five days after the rash appears. This means not going to daycare, school, work or anywhere there are others you could pass measles onto, and don’t have people visit you at home.

Let people you have been in contact with know that you have measles so that they can take appropriate steps to protect themselves and their family.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or call your GP. Please do not just turn up to your GP, after hours or emergency department as you could potentially infect others.

 

Measles is a notifiable disease. This means that health professionals or laboratories will inform us when someone has it. This allows us to monitor the number of people who have the disease and give them and health professionals advice on how to reduce the spread of measles. Our team will also speak to the person who has measles about who they have been in close contact with so we can provide those people with advice to help protect themselves and avoid spreading it further.  

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HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

There are specific requirements for notifiable diseases in the Auckland region.

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MEASLES CASES ON TWO SAMOA TO AUCKLAND FLIGHTS

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has been notified of passengers with measles on two flights from Samoa to Auckland last weekend.

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MEASLES CASE ON SAMOA TO AUCKLAND FLIGHT

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has been notified of a case of measles on a flight from Samoa to Auckland.

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MEASLES GUIDE FOR WORKPLACES

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MEASLES NEWSLETTER INSERT FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS

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MEASLES NEWSLETTER INSERT FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

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MEASLES PACK FOR SCHOOLS

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MEASLES OUTBREAK POSTER FOR ELSS

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MEASLES WHĀNAU PACK FOR ELSS

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MEASLES LEGAL GUIDELINES FOR EDUCATION PROVIDERS

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MEASLES FACT SHEET - MEDICAL, RADIATION ONCOLOGY AND HAEMATOLOGY PATIENTS

READ MORE

Last updated 13.11.2019

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